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arminsarmy:

marielovesgroban:

Don’t forget we have to wake up Green Day tomorrow.

Ok just a reminder to everyone: If you’re planning on tweeting billie joe armstrong “wake up” or something tomorrow, DON’T. The song is about his father’s death and so it’s really personal and treating it like a joke isn’t the right thing to do. Plus he’s asked so many times for people to stop and no one listens so yeah. Please don’t do that.

uncensoredhijabii:

kingjaffejoffer:

Husain Abdullah received an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty for praying on Monday. [Yahoo]

This is probably going to be a big deal tomorrow. The NFL can’t do anything right this year.

it is a big deal, how many times has tebow kneeled down? Has he ever been penalized? No. Bullshit. Then they have the audacity to be calling it excessive celebration, screw the NFL. Let a white Christian male kneel down and protect his ass, create a movement and call it tebowing, but once a Black Muslim Male does it, it’s flagged. IT’S ALL FUN AND GAMES UNTIL IT’S NO LONGER INVOLVING A WHITE CHRISTIAN MALE BUT RATHER A BLACK MUSLIM. LOAD OF B.S.

art-of-swords:

Late Anglo-Saxon Sword 

  • Dated: AD 875
  • Found: 1874 in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England

An iron sword fragment and hilt were found near Abingdon in Oxfordshire in 1874. The decoration on the sword hilt indicates this was a high status weapon dating from around AD 875. The style of the guards and pommel (Peterson style L) also suggest the sword dates from the late 9th to 10th century.

The sword hilt forms one of the most important examples of the late Anglo-Saxon silversmith’s art. The hilt is decorated with six silver engraved mounts; the engraved ornament on the mounts is in the Trewhiddle style - named after finds made at Trewhiddle, Cornwall. This style combines engraving and inlay with niello (black sulphide of silver).

The upper and lower guards are curved and contain various interlaced designs, including birds, animal and human figures, and foliate patterns. The figures on the upper guard have been identified as the four symbols of the evangelists.

The style of leaf used next to the figure of the eagle on the upper guard has also been identified on early tenth century embroideries from Durham, on the back of the Alfred Jewel and a number of other objects dating to this period.

The pommel incorporates two outward-looking animal heads, with protruding ears and round eyes and nostrils, now fragmentary. The lower portion of the iron blade is missing, however X-rays of the sword show that the blade is pattern welded.

The sword was acquired by Sir John Evans and presented to the Ashmolean in 1890. It is on display in the ‘England 400-1600’ gallery on the second floor.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Ashmolean Museum

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